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. that would include things like infrastructure, education, r&d. >> rose: science exploration. >> rose: and we spent about 30% on transfer payments to the elderly. >> we now spend 68% on transfer payments but investments are down to 15%. so i think to larry's point, what did we get out of the investment? well, we got the internet. we got g.p.s., we got the human genome. >> rose: so that's where you agree with him. >> i totally agree. and if you look at the sequester -- >> rose: that the investments are worthwhile and important and crucial to our future. >> yes, but we are cutting the investments so we can continue to let transfer payments to the elderly grow at a very rapid rate. we cannot do both. >> rose: or we're cutting the investments because we do not have a realistic look at where taxes-- which you're prepared to have a real itselfic look at. yes? in other words, you're not coming here as a representative a view often expressed by the 30 members of congress, although you had reservations about the health fund, defunding the health care even though you expressed riz reservations about it
. this is a show about science by scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace
the perception. they plan to use flying robots to deliver packages faster. >> it may look like science fiction. amazon says package delivers via drones could be five years away. the ayounnnouncement from the c coming hours before cyber monday. domminos pizza put out this video. amazon is serious. this tech writer believes them. >> you have to think about the scale of amazon, if they deploy this technology, they'll do it on a high scale. the technology advances at amazon, and if the faa puts the infrastructure in place, i don't see why it wouldn't. >> an order is boxed in a warehouse, attached to the drone and sent to the delivery address. 5 pounds much weight is allowed. one of the technical issues. >> how do we make them safe, that they can't be hacked and will not fall out of the sky or run into something. >> provided that is ironed out privacy concerns will prop up. it should have a plan that is riggerous. it should articulate to the federal aviation body. >> folks took to twitter to comment. many made light of it. jim priest writes: there's also a parody twitter address for amazon saying:
hands. they are the ones who always say they are science-based. do you think chimps, reptiles and tigers worry about that kind of crap? in the by -- biological world, nobody gives a dam. the fact you have to go out and chase your food and king congress eating -- king kong eating you they don't think about that. i need to be called ze. no you don't. you need to get some food and run your ass away from the predators. get some science. >> i love that. lions don't do it. that's basically what he said. lions don't do it. tracy, who cares, right? >> no, i think it is cool. if you want to ze, here is the problem with some of the pc pronouns. they look better on the page or or -- well actually it is the screen. it is your tablet and it is your phone. they don't work in conversation like talking. and this tells me that a lot of these folks are not actually having realtime old-fashioned old school conversation. they are doing a lot of texting. that's great. i have nothing against that. people need to have a sense of context. maybe some words work in print and not in person. >> that's a good point.
that gap between inter-academe beginning and science is certainly sunlight. [inaudible] >> -- i mean -- jan mark [inaudible] [inaudible] [laughter] [inaudible] merrimac >> i want to talk about this being about publishing. suppose you abolished the phd dissertation, which i think would be a great idea. save a lot of trees -- but about treason anymore. save a lot of cybersomething. most people publish dissertation never published another thing again. it's not the mark of being a scholar necessarily for being a teacher. not all of us are book writers. even great writers had their distances. 3000 word people, marathon runners, sprinters. but those are the good writers. it's our talent for that. it's not till that way you can be talented. the second set would be -- how should i put it, constraint unoriginality, liveliness, i see that as someone who's never published a peer-reviewed article. i have tried. >> to have to go into this a bit more quiet the mac you understand why. yet five, six, seven, 10. it is a being like a purÉe of me and. so that's my contribution to that part. >> maybe one more
and that would have meant more support for girls in math and science because they were not doing as well as boys at one time and we managed to close that gap, that would have meant helping boys despite everything else, reading, writing, school engagement, classroom comportment, pretty good research, teachers have a bias against unruly students. understandable but these students can be 5 or 6 years old. i don't know if it is something we want to blame the boys for or punish them for, we want to make a classroom happy place for the manned room for their personalities and high spiritedness. we haven't done a good enough job with that. >> host: is there a shortage of male teachers and does this have an effect if there is? >> guest: there are few male teachers in elementary school. you have slightly more in high school but still this is a slight exaggeration but one critic of the current school system said schools are run by women for girls. an overstatement not my much. a lot feel that way. researchers interviewed boys, why did you leave school? why did you drop out? one little boy said i thought no
at 6:00 stop -- at 6:00. workers were injured in a hazmat incident. the science wing was evacuated. say two staffls members were taken to the hospital. they are expected to be ok. howard county firefighters are investigating what caused a two alarm townhouse fire. news chopper seven flew over that scene of the unoccupied home in clarksville. traffic in the area was blocked as the crews worked to get the fire under control. it spread to an adjoining townhouse and caused damage. one firefighter sustained minor injuries, but was not hospitalized. the red cross is now helping six displaced people. >> we are checking traffic on this monday. right now, we are looking at volume areas -- volume delays around the area. the heaviest traffic on the inner loop through bethesda- silver spring. our latest incident on route one, a crash there. that should be out of the roadway. otherwise, just volume delays along the freeways. i-95 southbound, slow in several stretches between newington and woodbridge and beyond. a crash reported along the right side of the roadway. plenty of volume today on 66 out in
the budgets are going. >> private industry science. >> you have a new one. >> you got it in. >> very good. >>> coming up next on "new day," newtown, connecticut, bracing for the release of 911 tapes from the deadly school shooting that happened almost one year ago. we'll have more on what you can expect. >>> and bill clinton's spreading out the tea leaves again. what did he say about his wife hillary and the chances that she'll run? the chances that she won't run? we'll try to decipher the code when we come back. ood things for the whole community: the environment, seniors, kids, and animals. that's why we created the share the love event. by the end of this year, the total donated by subaru could reach 35 million dollars. you get a great deal on a new subaru. we'll donate 250 dollars to a choice of charities that benefit your community. it feels good to be a helping hand. ♪ by the end of december, we'll be delivering ♪ ♪ through 12 blizzards blowing ♪ 8 front yards blinding ♪ 6 snowballs flying ♪ 5 packages addressed by toddlers ♪ ♪ that's a q ♪ 4 lightning bolts ♪ 3
: but this bad science is pushed in video by talented people. >> with you do something in a narrative form or a recognizable actress with a clever theme as you have said that looks like a horror movie and it is very effective. the people that flash the environmental agenda have a tremendous resource with celebrities who are willing to do this kind of video. john: americc's biggest environmental success is tracking for natural gas.d amers cardinal put many celebrities like john lennon's wife and son trash it is don't frack my mother then the crowd follows. >> they do. powerfully they sway natalie their followers like when george clooney spotted off on global warming says something, it goes global. unlike the and on celebrities who cannot get the word out quite as effectively. they are a great power. john: james hirsen. by the way ed begley, jr. said he either does conservation from his conservative father it was wrong to waste any resource. we also reached out to every actor about the hypocrisy but not one responded. hollywood makes millions selling stuff to us but at the same time they say
surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> back of the book segment tonight. animals running wild. yesterday a black bear attacked a 4-year-old susan chalfant in a suburb of orlando, florida, if you can believe it. she was mauled by the bear while walking her two small dogs. >> is this a fire or medical emergency. >> medical. a woman, i think, has been mobbed by a bear. she is bleeding. she needs immediate help. >> okay. are you still with her right now, steve? >> yes, my wife is with her right now. we have her in the house. but she is pleading for quick, quick help. she is in severe pain. >> okay. and you said it was a bear, for sure? >> she thinks it was a bear. >> okay. how old is she? >> i can't tell. you know, she is so bloody i can't tell. >> now, ms. chalfant remains to be hospitalized with what are said to be traumatic injuries to her face and other parts of her body. joining us from kansas city, "time" magazine editor at large who wrote a story for the magazine about the growing problem with wild animals. so i understand it's bears an
help people get started. >> and of this looks like science fiction, it's not. melissa: drawn delivery in 30 minutes a less, just like a piping hot pizza. >> the doorman, looks like the drone is coming down. melissa: i will send it down. the young and the reckless. the young are turning on president obama and a big way. >> that don't like obama, republicans, their parents. how come we can't get a job? alchemy have to pay back the we have no money. >> experiencing a harsh reality of big government failed liberal policies and is sitting in the pocketbook. ♪ melissa: you against the guy sitting next to you. >> no. >> you have to look good your office. it is a battlefield. >> it is a battlefield. melissa: "spare change." let's get to the bottom of this. >> why this study is bull crap. bart simpson and say it, so i can say it. melissa: time to deck the halls. >> this is the nike star bandit. melissa: this is incredible. look at that. you brought your mouse at our blue to. big, fuzzier months. i don't know why you're trying to were those metro black ones. >> is the ones are worth of. >> i
lover of science and philosophy so that was an early influence because raising me in california there were all sorts of influences but i had lessons and i took latin and french and i think we had a fight with the school system because with latin and spanish and french they said you can't take three language and my mother managed to turn this california school into a little prep school on the east coast. so a very strong influence on me. .. strong influence postmark before we go to call, how did you end up at the american enterprise university? >> guest: once i was on tenure, i went on a ship that went around the world and it's about 30 professors in the wonderful program. i was friends with all of them. i liked all of the teachers but they were certainly didn't radical. it was marxist, and this was in 1988. the soviet union was intact and yugoslavia was celebrated as a model society. so long story short i came off the ship and wrote an essay called the professor at sea. especially since it was so colorful. teaching these young women that they were oppressed and again, i found it
this looks like science-fiction. it's not. >> wow. >> this is early. this is still years away. drops the package. >> there's the package. >> you get your package. we can do half hour delivery. designee said years away but he went on to say maybe four or five. he said the plan is not practical and wouldn't work for all items. >> he's one of the new tech geniuses. i got to say, this is a good indication that this guy, just like steve jobs before him, dropping a lot of acid. dropping a lot of acid because that will never happen. >> you have a tremendous tree line here. i can't quite get the drone in. what about a parking lot. >> how do you get it to -- >> does not happen. >> weekly reader things there will be flying cars by the end of the century. >> are you still reading "weekly reader." >> i still read "weekly reader." >> amazon is amazing. >> how do you do it in a city. >> dropped to your whole building. >> they are amazon. >> they can do anything. >> they can do everything. order diapers and they are there by dinner time. >> they can be here before you get off the set. >> i often am
are down four spots in science coming in at 24. and they slipped another -- >> this is unbelievable. >> ten spots -- >> look at that. >> to 21st when it comes to reading. several chinese cities as well as japan and singapore saw their students improve significantly. >> willie geist, your mom has been involved in educational reform. we were talking about mike bloomberg who dedicated four years to it. the gates spent billions and billions of dollars and the only thing -- not the only thing but one of the main things they learned reducing class sides. they spent billions of dollars on that. that doesn't work. man, the past four years when it seems everybody's focus has turned to education reform in a big way, just been disastrous, not disastrous but terrible. our state of the union are getting worse and worse. >> this is a trajectory we've seen for more than a decade. it goes back. maybe you say we'll give the reforms of the last few years to settle in. reaction to this study was amazing. you have all these special interest groups saying it's not our fault. it's not the fact that we're teachin
proceeding. the most a man of science comedy johnny one of his descendants the t3 offer came as the heads of the major city providence. this is interesting to see if reason is simply about learning to balance reason i was fifteen and that is because of a fall it's an energy that i didn't feel anywhere else meditations on it but that's it sent the bike and was the no on can combine the museum fountain and art said sharif as well as cultural and spiritual capital. his boss that the government of the most useful. in fact they are close. it just a kitten intellectuals can post a few years many of them cover we'd university. no one had a fever and this was the world's first university in the lead and that has always attracted thinkers from far and wide including westerners. and while this is just upset me. so fast that the second study to be a book and the moon the moon. london irish medical professor noted in may means towards him though. historically fares is pride itself on its openness and tolerance safely say they voted that it opened at site to talk about gnosticism. and so did those th
recognizes the gentleman from alabama, mr. brooks, for five minutes. mr. speaker, the science space and technology committee recently held a hearing on healthcare.gov cybersecurity threats. our bipartisan expert witness panel included dr. frederick check, a computer science professor at s.m.u., dr. ruben, a computer science professor at johns hopkins university, david kennedy, former chief security officer of dibold incorporated and currently the principal security consultant for trusted sec, and morgan write, formerly with cisco security and now c.e.o. of crowd sourced investigations. now i'm not a cybersecurity expert, but i can read the words of those who are. the s.s.t. committee's hearing charter informs members that in order to fully use healthcare.gov, american citizens must input or verify highly personal information such as date of birth and social security numbers for all family members, household salary, debt information, credit card information, place of employment, home addresses, and the like. information that is a treasure-trove for cybercriminals and identity thieves
basically met at a science fair in london, the delegates, and met a young canadian women, 16. we met at the hospital. and i had taken a year off between high-school going to oxford. i would visitor. so i worked, you know, oddly enough in north london. oftentimes. to earn enough money to go and see her. i arrived in montreal in the early 1952. and then after a little while there was this huge continent beyond. so my parents dismayed when they learned about it, hitchhiking to vancouver. not a very long time, people were very nice. some dispatch. and then i decided to go and have a look at america. been fascinated by any english child, the cisco kid and champion and all of those kinds of programs. so i entered the united states. the time of blame in washington state. the first time i remember seeing , the incident as its i looked bewildered. stopped and picked me up. so would you like to come to seattle. that was the beginning of a series of unbelievable things which -- i visited every single state in the union, well, at least a lie, everyone in the continental u.s. i traveled -- i thin
. and there is a system called regenerative medicine and it's almost like science fiction. it is when they take your cells and they grow a large number of them and then they take the 3-d printing in the most recent version and they print out the organ that you need. if they need a kidney, they can print that out. it was headed by a woman doctor whose specialty is growing heart and you will see in a few years -- you remember the young lady that had a hard time getting a lung transplant? ten years from now if we are smart, if we encourage this, there will be no waiting lines. you will replant yourself. it turns out the you don't reject you. so this is very important. what means is that you don't take any of those antirejection medicines. so you lower the cost and you increase the likelihood of success and you eliminate the waiting lists and you have a different world. the number one problem is the food and drug administration and virtually everyone i've talked to have said that this includes china, japan, india, because of this food and drug administration, this is hopeless. what we talk about is that pione
in ottawa. general lawson graduated from the military college of canada with a bachelor of science degree as well as a master of science in the electrical can engineering and while attending the u.s. armed forces command staff college in montgomery, alabama, he completed a masters of public administration in at auburn. so he's thoroughly educated, i think it's fair to say. drawing on that record of service and expertise, general lawson has agreed to share his thoughts on the u.s./canadian defense relationship. secretary hagel just last week called this relationship one of the strongest in the world and, indeed, our canadian friends have fought alongside american troops in the volatile kandahar province in afghanistan at the height of the conflict, and they continue to deploy some 950 troops this a training capacity near kabul. just this past friday, they signed the canada/u.s. asia-pacific cooperation framework to increase our security cooperation in this important region. this will be done in the framework of the canada/u.s. joint board of defense. this is the context in which general la
news now." you know, from a young age. i definitely want to major in political science. become the mayor or something. make the situation better for other people. my name is justin, and i am your dividend. ♪ c is for cookie ♪ ♪ c is for cookie that's good enough for me ♪ c is for cookie that's good enough for me ♪ cookie cookie cookie starts with c ♪ >> y is for yummy. marble cookie day and when there is food involved it is always our favorite story of the day. >> took a trip to manhattan to find how they make the maple bacon cookie for this week's edition of "onsome nikkei kitchen." >> reporter: insomniacs we're in the kitchen today with zachary. he is the owner and manufacturer of schmackary's . it smells so good. wish you were here. ♪ >> today, i'm going to show you how to make one of our infamous cookies here, maple bacon. start with the butter and put it in the mixer here and brown and white sugar in here. we're going to let that get nice and creamy in there. that's when we are going to add our eggs and when we will get the first dose of maple.
, america scores 26th in math. 17th in reading and 21 in science. >> okay. it may be average in most areas, but it did rank near the top in spending at number five. >> yes. >> are we getting most bang for our buck here? >> so this is a little troubling. the report notes that spending does not necessarily correlate to higher scores. so the united states spends between the ages of 6 and 15 $115,000 per student. to put that in some context, the slovak republic has scores similar to ours, and they only spend $53,000. >> that's extraordinary when you think about how much we're spending and what we're getting. the importance of these findings, julia, put this into perspective. what does it say about our educational system, and should we be worried about those low math scores and the way we're coming in against everybody else on pretty much every other barometer? >> so it is a little bit concerning, but to put it in more context, the united states has never really done well on these sorts of international assessments. since the '60s and '70s, we've scored in the middle or bottom of international
behind their peers in other countries. the u.s. is now ranked 31st in math 24th in science, and 21st in reading. the assessment is based on a worldwide test taken last year by 6,000 american 15-year-olds. the test results show no improvement by u.s. students over the past decade. >>> time to show you some of this morning's headlines. "the wall street journal" says the number of banks in the united states are at their lowest level since the great depression. federally insured banks shrank to about 6900 in the third quarter, from a high of about 18,000. many smaller banks merged or simply collapsed. but overall bank deposits and assets are growing. >>> the "detroit free press" says a judge rules this morning on whether to allow the city's bankruptcy to proceed. about $18 billion in debt and liabilities must be dealt with. >> "the new york times" looks at soaring hospital charges. a day spent as an inpatient at an american hospital costs an average of more than $4,000. that is five times the cost in many other modern countries. a single stitch can cost $500. >> the
sciences. somebody thinks you're doing right. stock is doing okay too. >> the stock is doing okay and reflection after the team and efforts we're making really helping patients. tracy: ceo francois nadir. doctor, thanks for being here. sticking with it for all the people out there. >> we'll do that. thank you. tracy: ash? >> ashley: thank you, tracy. dow is higher by triple digits on great jobs numbers but will wall street fear a fed taper that could come soon irrather than later? we'll look over that next half hour. tracy: christmas parties are back. in wine with me we'll talk about the new york's morrell's about the trend they're seeing. ashley: gotta have it. we'll go to the outlet malls for the final segment of our series. the president of premium outlets is here next. tracy: as we head out to break, look at some winners and losers on the s&p 500. electronic arts is up today. 5.24%. must mean ashley's boys are buying games. we'll be right back? ashley: yes. ♪ hi honey, did you get e toaster cozy? yep. got all the cozies. [ grandma ] with n fedex one rate, i could ll a box an
called regenerative medicine which is almost like science fiction. regenerative medicine is when they take your cells and they grow a large number of them. and they then take 3-d printing in the most recent version, and they print out the organ you need. so if you need a kidney, they can print out a kidney. if you need a heart, they can print out a heart. the texas regenerative medicine institute is headed by a woman doctor whose specialty is growing hearts. and you'll see in a few years remember the young lady who had a hard time getting a lung transplant because she was too young and the bureaucratic rules didn't work? ten years from now, if we're smart, if we encourage this, ten years from now there'll be no waiting lines, because you won't transplant. you will replant yourself. and it turns out you don't reject you. so the net effect -- this is very important. what it means is you don't take any of those antirejection medicines. so you radically lower the cost, you dramatically increase the likelihood of success, you eliminate waiting lists. it's a different world. number one
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back, everyone. i'm john berman in for carol costello today. we have the opening bell ringing on wall street, where stocks are on solid footing this morning after that better than expected jobs report on friday. market opening up just a little bit today and soon traders will be tracking a new addition to the new york stock exchange. amc theaters moving to go public. some of the customer also reap rewards. alison kosik has more on this. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. quickly stocks got to mention stocks because the market's still in the afterflow of the strong jobs report along with the drop in unemployment to 7%. the optimism fueled by a jump in economic growth in the third quarter as well. the thought was that investors would sell because of worries the fed would pull back on stimulus. now it seems like the market's not bothered by it because the thinking at the moment is the economy could be strong enough to handle it. >>> amc, it's all about that stock, a little popcorn, a little stock. am
and they're being used to do science surveys. >> these are not places that have skyscrapers and a lot of -- in theory, there's not a lot of other aerospace clutter, if you will. that's a big deal. it would never work in manhattan, for example. >> well, i guess i would never say never. the truth is technologically speaking they could fly one of these things from downtown to midtown to your offices here today. >> look at cars. they can tell you when to stop, how fast, when to move. >> that's true, never say never. >> the technology greatly exceeds their ability. >> how about flying in inclimate weather? could the flying ha batibachi, wasn wanted to take off -- >> i raise you one. thieves. there's a $40,000 drone. i'll shoot it out of the sky. >> they're doing research right now to use drones to carry explosives for avalanche control in the mountains. >> that would be fascinating. >> when it's so foggy or the weather is so bad you can't send people out for avalanches for highways, for instance -- >> genius. >> you could program it to travel up at noon and drop an explosive for avalanche
is a sort of doomsday science that wobbles and pessimism. i recall the famous statement by president lyndon johnson when he described intelligence, he developed the memory of when he was milking a cow on the farm down at the river as a young man, and he said he would get the bucket filled with pure milk and then the cat would relieve itself in the milk. and president johnson said the relief -- and he met relief in the bad way -- that was intelligence. [laughter] so you can imagine how that hurt our feelings. [laughter] but there is another metaphor that i often hear and that is the famous woody allen comment that we in the intelligence community like to provide options to policymakers, and so we look out at the world and say, we are at a crossroads. one path leads to death and destruction, and the other path leads to total annihilation. [laughter] and we hope you policymakers would be able to the wisdom to choose the right course. but, in fact, in my experience and the spirits i think we're going to relate today on the balkans is that intelligence is, when it works well, a collaborative ent
. >> it gives them the about to put together the story. >> reporter: but there's a big gender gap in science, technology, engineering and math. women make up almost half the work force but fill less than a quarter of jobs in those fields. goldieblocks isn't the only company giving girls serious play things. >> lego friends. >> reporter: lego has gotten in on the game. barbie is a computer engineer, and roominate, a doll house construction set that comes we electric electrical s electrical curcuits. talk about girl power. >> reporter: a future where girls can dream big. >> girls are out there making a difference in the world too. >> now you promise notice there is pink in goldieblocks. pink and purple are the most popular girl colors. it's not about that but giving them toys that use their brain. >> gift ideas for my nieces. >> it's great. thank you so much. coming up next, we heard of therapy dogs but how about therapy chickens? one family is fighting to keep their young son's beloved animal. it helps this little boy. we have the story coming up. but first, this is "today" on nbc. [ female a
any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. because what you don't know, can hurt you.urance. what if you didn't know that posting your travel plans online may attract burglars? [woman] off to hawaii! what if you didn't know that as the price of gold rises, so should the coverage on your jewelry? [prospector] ahh! what if you didn't know that kitty litter can help you out of a slippery situation? the more you know, the better you can plan for what's ahead. talk to farmers and get smarter about your insurance. ♪ we are farmers bum - pa - dum, bum - bum - bum - bum♪ >>> nelson mandela spent, what, 27 years in prison. much of that time was spent in the notoriously brutal conditions on robben island off the coast of south africa. few can recount the horror that nelson mandela had to endure. one man certainly can. this man was imprisoned on robben island while mandela was there. and he's joining us. thank you for coming in. tell our viewers what daily life was like for prisoners on robben island. >> so much so, that it was easy to forget the
plant et, science. overall strategy was, make discovery and tlc stronger but invest in a lot of new channels, velocity's another new channel. market share has grown to 11% of viewership on cable. we grew our portfolio 4% in a mark that's flat. year before we were up six. the year before up four. >> do you think you can keep doing it? >> that's the question. >> we think we can. this year we grew four. and we still believe, if you tell great stories with great characters under a strong brand, more people will watch. in the u.s. we're going continue to do that. i think we can continue to win. on tonigp of that in the u.s. viewership has flattened out and subscribers have flattened out. the advertising mark remains strong. the ability to get cpm growth when the differential between the broadcast cpm and cable still significant, it's a big helper. and in the u.s., we're getting paid more money for our content. we have netflix and amazon buying content. ability to get higher subfees from the distributors in the u.s. has gotten better. >> there may be weakness in the scatter mark, have you
for retirement and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "new day." sea world is facing more backlash. the latest act to bow out of an upcoming performance there, martin savidge joins us. >> there's been a growing defection in the music world. ten days ago a canadian rock group bowed out, willie nelson, and now comes heart. the cnn film "black fish" has a lot to do with it. millions tuned in to see the critically acclaimed documentary "blackfish" when it aired on cnn in october. the film has fueled the controversial debate over keeping killer whales in captivity and the dangers they pose to trainers. >> i think they're meant to be in the wild and that's pretty much where they should be. >> i'd rather see them out in like in their natural habitat. >> reporter: petitions on change.org amassed thousands of signatures, calling on sea world to free its killer whales. and pressured several musical groups to pull out of scheduled performances at its orlando theme park, taking notice of the publ
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)